How to bring floral design into your home

Inspiration & trends

It’s said that Britain is a nation of gardeners. But even if you only have a window box, you can still enjoy maximum flower power in your home’s interior.

To celebrate Floral Design Day, a date on the US calendar to mark the importance of flowers and how they bring pleasure and enjoyment to people, we’re taking a look at the enduring trend of bringing the outside in.

A rich history of floral design

Although its exact origins are not known, floral prints are believed to have first appeared in East Central Asia in the 12th century when fabrics were embroidered with silk flowers, birds and animals. 

Floral patterns quickly grew in popularity, particularly in Europe and the Middle East, and at the beginning of the Victorian era they were seen as a symbol of elegance and exquisite taste.

In the 1800s and 1900s, our love affair with floral design continued to blossom, with patterned fabrics eventually inspiring the wallpaper and soft furnishings trend that we now know and love. 

Floral design furniture 

Floral patterns work particularly well on seating, adding depth and interest without becoming overbearing. British designers ercol are masters at this, as can be seen in their Renaissance range.

Renaissance sofa
They’ve been among the best in the business since 1920 and it shows with these classic ercol sofas and chairs that will never date.

An equally attractive floral choice from ercol is the Evergreen High Back two-seater sofa, which has a touch of 1960s sass about it, beautifully offset by its elegant fabric.

Ercol evergreen sofa
Another home-grown brand with some serious heritage is G Plan and, as you’d expect, they know how fond we are of floral. Their Florence range is a smart choice for traditionalists who value comfort and craft.

Florence sofa
Nottinghamshire firm Duresta have been leading English style for more than 70 years and are not afraid to use high-impact fabrics inspired by the great outdoors.

Mayfair 4 seater sofa
This Mayfair four-seater sofa has a tapestry as rich as the garden of any stately home.

Vienna table set
Floral seats can also make a lovely feature in a dining room. The Vienna dining table set is an elegant example, with its upholstered chairs complemented by the glass table top which shows them off to their best.

Flower beds

Floral patterns are a common motif on bed linen, but this modern Summer design takes things further by introducing blooms to the king size double bed frame itself.

Summer kingsize bed
After a night’s sleep in this, you’re sure to wake up feeling as fresh as a daisy.

Make light work of floral design 

Who said floral design only works when it’s on furniture?

Detailed work has gone into producing the Belis chrome table lamp, featuring pretty glass petals. A delicate piece, it would make a lovely gift or a treat for yourself - lasting far longer than a bunch of flowers. 

Bellis chrome table lamp
Prefer something with a bit more colour? This Tulip floor lamp has five stunning stems for something truly unique and eye-catching.

Tulip floor lamp

Floral accessories

As we’ve already seen, soft furnishings and florals are a match made in heaven but if you’re afraid of patterns, introduce a smaller item instead like the Monaco floral cushion.

Monaco floral cushion
Tasteful yet lavish, this will make plain beds, sofas or chairs look grand.

Alison floral red cushion
The Alison Red Floral Cushion is another really pretty piece that evokes the sense of dazzling summer meadows even on the dreariest of days.

Fable scatter cushion
For a more modern choice, take a look at the Fable scatter cushion which is vibrant but not overstated.

Kick pair of scatter cushions
The Kick pair of scatter cushions would also work well in a contemporary interior, thanks to the bold print and muted shades. 

Say it with flowers

Finally, we couldn’t bring you our tribute to Floral Design Day without including a vase - and this one is a real beauty.

Chrome rose vase
Featuring dozens of stunning rose petals, it will look spectacular with or without a bouquet